One Hundred years after World War I, national minorities did not disappear from Europe

29.11.2018 | European Parliament
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One Hundred years after World War I, national minorities did not disappear from Europe

One hundred years after the end of World War I, national minorities did not disappear from Europe, they still want to preserve their identity, in the area where they lived for centuries -said Csaba Sógor in Brussels on the mini plenary session on Wednesday.

RMDSZ MEP has reported to his fellow Members, that in the last few days he has visited a region in Europe, South Tyrol, which has not always been one of the most peaceful and developed regions over the past hundred years, but we can now rightly say it is. South Tyrol belongs to Italy now, but has a significant German population that disposes of autonomy and has become one of the most developed regions of its country.

“The ethnic groups that live side by side did not always agree, the vicissitudes of history cannot be undone. However, with dialogue, negotiations, and a series of consultations between Italy and Austria, harmonious and peaceful institutions of territorial autonomy have been established. They have clearly achieved stability in a previously conflicted region”- said the MEP.

Csaba Sógor reminded: there are several other multi-ethnic regions in Europe today, such as Transylvania in Romania, that would need the implementation of this well-proven method.